Tag Archives: Belgium

Desmond Tutu joins Belgium in nominating murderer for Nobel Peace Prize

South African archbishop and prominent anti-Israel campaigner Desmond Tutu has joined politicians in Belgium in nominating imprisoned Palestinian arch-terrorist Marwan Barghouti for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Tutu tabled the nomination in a letter to the Norwegian Nobel Committee on Monday in which he hailed the convicted murderer a symbol of the “struggle for freedom, [which] constitutes a clear signal of support for the realization of the Palestinian people’s inalienable rights, including to self-determination.”

tutuTutu is a longtime anti-Israel activist, and is a member of the “International High Level Committee of the Campaign for the freedom of Barghouti and all Palestinian prisoners.”

Barghouti is the former leader of the Tanzim armed wing of Fatah and was convicted in Israel of being the founder of the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade, another Fatah terror group.

He was convicted in 2004 on five counts of murder and one attempted murder, and was implicated in and held responsible for four other terror attacks.

In his letter, Tutu characterized Barghouti’s actions as fighting “for freedom and peace,” and – even more ironically – hailed the mass-murderer as “an active advocate and defender of democracy and human rights, include women’s rights, and of pluralism, both religious and political, in a region and a world that desperately needs such advocates.”

Barghouti received his support in Belgium from both the Senate and House of Representatives who penned a letter to the Nobel nominating committee praising him as a peace activist and key to future talks between Israel and the Palestinians.

While Tutu and others attempt to manipulate and distort the true character of Barghouti, the victims and countless grieving relatives of his attacks are the only ones with the legitimacy to be heard.

Belgium refuses teens’ request for financial aid after parents murdered in terrorist attack but nominates terrorist for noble peace prize

Belgium has made a decision to refuse a request for financial assistance from the daughters of an Israeli couple killed in the 2014 terrorist attack on the Jewish Museum in Brussels.

Aftermath of the terrorist attack on the Jewish Museum in Brussels
Aftermath of the terrorist attack on the Jewish Museum in Brussels

Meanwhile, the country’s lawmakers from across the political spectrum have apparently nominated jailed Fatah leader Marwan Barghouti for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Barghouti is currently serving five life sentences in an Israeli jail for his role in murderous terror attacks during the Second Intifada in the early 2000s.

Sisters, Shira and Ayelet Riva were 15 and 17 at the time of the attack. Their parents, Mira and Emmanuel Riva were on vacation and touring the museum in May 2014 when Mehdi Nemmouche, opened fire on museum visitors and staff.

belgium 2Nemmouche, a Frenchman, was believed by authorities to have left for Syria via Belgium to fight with jihadists in 2012 before returning to Europe.

Along with the Rivas, a French volunteer at the museum and a Belgian employee were killed in the attack.

The Belgium commission that decides on assistance for victims of intentional acts of violence refused to grant the girls application, saying there was no “urgent need.” Urgent need is defined as a request in the first six months following an attack.

The Riva teens, who live in Tel Aviv, filed their application for the assistance 10 months after the attack. The sisters’ attorney said since the girls were not Belgian citizens, it was more difficult to file the request and took longer.

They had applied for the flat allocation of 15,000 euros, which is generally provided as standard in such cases.

Barghouti has received his support from both the Belgian Senate and House of Representatives who penned a letter to the Nobel nominating committee praising him as a peace activist and key to future talks between Israel and the Palestinians.

Barghouti is the former leader of the Tanzim armed wing of Fatah and was convicted in Israel of being the founder of the Al-Aqsa Martyrs Brigade, another Fatah terror group.

He was convicted in 2004 on five counts of murder and one attempted murder, and was implicated in and held responsible for four other terror attacks.

Barghouti has remained politically active from behind bars, and is frequently proclaimed as one of a few likely successors to the 82-year-old Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas.

belgium 3Barghouti is also seen by some as a potentially unifying force in the divisive world of Palestinian politics, which is split between Hamas, Fatah and several smaller factions.

He is also favoured by some on the Israeli left, as a possible successor to Abbas, for his support of a two-state solution and his supposed renouncement of violence.

Belgian terror hotline ‘only recognise Palestine’

In an episode that barely beggars belief, an operator in Belgium’s Federal hotline for the terrorist attacks in Brussels told a Jewish caller that Israel does not exist, and is in fact called Palestine.

images-3The call to the Belgian Interior Ministry’s hotline, which followed the terrorist attacks on Brussels airport, was recorded and the audio file posted on the website of Joods Actueel, a Belgian Jewish monthly.

The transcript is as follows:

Jewish Coordination Committee Volunteer: Good morning. I’m a volunteer for the Jewish Coordination Counsel in Antwerp. We have two Jews who were injured in the attack at the airport.

Belgian Federal Emergency Hotline: Yes, go ahead.

Jewish Coordination Committee Volunteer: They are ready to be transported to Israel. Our volunteers are making sure that everything is in place, but we received information from the hospital that we need a special permit from the police to get them released from the hospital. Whom do we need to speak with in order to get this permit?

Belgian Federal Emergency Hotline: Let me check. They need to go to Palestine.

Jewish Coordination Committee Volunteer: (Pause) Not Palestine. Israel.

Belgian Federal Emergency Hotline: Yes, but it was Palestine before, of course.

Jewish Coordination Committee Volunteer: Can you repeat that for me? What’s your name?

Belgian Federal Emergency Hotline: It’s Palestine.

Jewish Coordination Committee Volunteer: Can I get your name please?

Belgian Federal Emergency Hotline: Of course. It’s Zachariah.

Jewish Coordination Committee Volunteer: And you only recognize Palestine?

Belgian Federal Emergency Hotline: Sorry?

Jewish Coordination Committee Volunteer: You don’t recognize Israel, correct? Only Palestine?

Belgian Federal Emergency Hotline: I only know that the Jews went to live there, that Palestine accepted them, and that there is a war between Israel and Palestine, of course. And the occupation. That what’s always on the news.

Jewish Coordination Committee Volunteer: Are you able to assist me with my request?

Belgian Federal Emergency Hotline: Yes, of course. They are returning to Palestine and they asked if they can receive a permit. Of course. Here it is.

Michael Freilich, editor-in-chief of Joods Actueel, said it “defies imagination” that a Belgian state employee would display the anti-Israeli behavior that is commonplace in Arab countries. He also called for punishing the operator instead of issuing the “standard apology.”

A spokesperson for the crisis center told Joods Actueel that it deeply deplores the “isolated case” and will take “necessary actions” against the staffer in question, which the center said was not a civil servant, but a call center employee.

The recording’s release follows at least four recorded cases in which people who either spoke Arabic or were clothed in Muslim traditional garb, destroyed, concealed or removed Israeli flags at an impromptu memorial space set up for the attacks’ victims at Place de la Bourse in Brussels. It features many flags, including those of Arab countries and the Palestinian Authority.

Is it any wonder that the Jewish community in Belgium has questioned the future viability of a continued long-term future?

Let us know what you think by using the comments section below or by emailing us at secretary@antisemitismwatch.com

Rabbi attacked in Brussels

A young rabbi from the Netherlands said unidentified individuals threw stones at him at a park in Brussels in a suspected anti-Semitic incident.

images-3The rabbi asked for anonymity, citing a desire to have his name only,  “associated with positive issues, and not anti-Semitism.”

He said he was walking through the park in Brussels’ southern district of Forest with a friend when “stones were thrown at us. For one reason only: being visibly Jewish.” No one was hurt in the incident, he said. He did not see the people who threw the stones at him and his conversation partner.

The rabbi, who is in Brussels to visit family, said that he has had anti-Semitic insults hurled at him sometimes in the Netherlands, but never stones.

Commenting on his assault in Brussels, the young Dutch rabbi said: “I hope and pray that the leaders of the Muslim communities in Europe … stop their unhealthy obsession with Israel and the Jewish communities and they should start taking responsibility for their youth.”

Read more here.

Historic levels of immigration to Israel, fueled by European anti-Semitism?

Jews in Europe feel as threatened now in Europe as they did during World War II and the Holocaust, experts have said.

An exodus of western European Jews have flocked to Israel after rising anti-Semitic attacks reached an all-time high.

Almost 10,000 Jews from West Europe immigrated to Israel in 2015, the highest annual number ever.

Nearly 80 per cent of the migrants are from France, where attacks have left the world’s third-largest Jewish population rattled.

While Jews have been targeted in Belgium, Denmark and other European countries, France has has been the most dangerous for Jewish people.

Just this week, a machete-wielding teen attacked a Jewish teacher in the French town of Marseille, prompting a local Jewish authority to ask fellow Jews to refrain from wearing their traditional skull caps to stay safe.

There are increasing reports of assaults and intimidation against Jews by mostly from Muslim extremists.

France is still recovering from a series of attacks in Paris on Nov. 13 that killed 130 people and mourned the anniversary of the Charlie Hebdo attacks, the same day a kosher grocery store was attacked, leaving 17 people dead.

In each case, the Islamic State group claimed responsibility.

France’s Jewish community of 500,000 people is the largest in Europe.

Jewish schools and synagogues are often surrounded by soldiers in combat fatigues who patrol the streets with automatic rifle.

Though Jews make up less than 1 percent of the population, French officials say more than 50 percent of all reported racist attacks in 2014 were directed against them.

While some attacks have been linked to anger at Israeli policies toward the Palestinians, most have been anti-Semitic in nature.

Close to 800 Jews have have left Britain for Israel and Italy and Belgium follow next on the list.

‘That a record number of European Jews feel that Europe is no longer their home should alarm European leaders and serve as a wake-up call for all who are concerned about the future of Europe,’ said Jewish Agency Chairman Natan Sharansky.

‘At the same time, the fact that Israel has become the number one destination for European Jews seeking to build a better future elsewhere is a tribute to the appeal of life in Israel and the values the Jewish state represents,’ Sharansky added.

Follow the link to the original article here.

Anti-Semitic threats received

A Jewish family from Belgium and a French university director received Anti-Semitic threats, according to reports in French-language media.

The family from Rhode-Saint-Genese near Brussels received on Tuesday a letter with a swastika and the words “dirty Jews.” The mother, identified only as Anne in an article published by La Capitale, said she did not know who might have sent the letter.

Joel Rubinfeld, Founder of the Belgian League Against Anti-Semitism.
Joel Rubinfeld,
Founder of the Belgian League Against Anti-Semitism.

The family filed a complaint with police and contacted Joel Rubinfeld, founder of the Belgian League Against Anti-Semitism.

The family received the letter two days after a commemoration held on the one-year anniversary of the murder of four people, allegedly by an Islamist who is on trial and is denying his involvement in the attack, at the Jewish Museum of Belgium.

The museum’s spokesperson, Chouna Lomponda, a Belgian woman of African descent, also received a threat Tuesday on Facebook, she told La Capitale. “Stop showing and talking for Jews. It could be dangerous for you,” the text read.

In France, the director of the Technical University Institution, or IUT, in Saint-Denis near Paris, who has received multiple death threats this year, is believed to have been targeted anew by unknown individuals who sent five of his colleagues text massages reading: “You too will fall. You work for Jews.”

In addition to the messages to the colleagues of Samuel Mayol, a Star of David was painted on the door of an office of a teacher at the institution, the Le Figaro daily reported Thursday.

The National Bureau for Vigilance Against Anti-Semitism, or BNVCA, on Wednesday condemned the incident in a statement and praised France’s education minister, Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, for also condemning it and classifying it as anti-Semitic.

Read the original article here.

And another European country shows rise in Antisemitic hate

Mirroring what has been happening in much of Europe, and further afield, the Netherlands is the latest nation to report a significant rise in Antisemitic hate crime and incidents.

Last year the number recorded rose by 71 percent and, worryingly, some police officers are unwilling to intervene, the Jewish community’s watchdog (the Hague-based Center for Information and Documentation on Israel, or CIDI) on Antisemitism said.

Their statement noted “a worrisome phenomenon — Police officers’ failure to intervene in cases of evident anti-Semitism. Some police officer prefers to look the other way.”

ASW24A woman who wanted to report an anti-Semitic threat after hosting a party was questioned about whether she had permission to hold the party, CIDI wrote.

“The filing of a complaint was sometimes discouraged in contrast with the policy that indeed seeks to enhance reporting,” according to the report.

CIDI also said the severity of the incidents increased. Those who wore kippahs or other Jewish symbols on the street accounted for a large portion of the overall number of victims of anti-Semitic harassment or attacks last year.

The prevalence of incidents in which individuals were harassed on the street because they were perceived as Jewish rose by 90 percent in 2014 over the previous year. Incidents in which people were physically assaulted in anti-Semitic attacks doubled.

“The serious increase of the number of anti-Semitic incidents in 2014 worsened the feeling of insecurity within the Jewish community, especially in view of the May 2014 attack on the Jewish Museum of Belgium in Brussels and the threat of returning jihadists,” CIDI wrote.

Read more here.