Tag Archives: Chicago

Word of caution to Stamford Hill community – Learn from the Lakewood experience

With members of the London Stamford Hill Charedi community being priced out of the area, some are now trying to snap up houses on Canvey Island, Essex.

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The site of the former Castle View School on the Island will be transformed into a private Jewish school, Essex County Council has confirmed.

The Charedi community, is understood to have paid £1.75million for the former school building, which closed five years ago, and its attached playing fields.

Residents living around the site have started to experience members of the community knocking on their doors offering to pay above the market price for their houses, despite them not being up for sale.

AntiSemitismWatch has already taken the step of sending messages into the Stamford Hill community in an attempt that the experiences of the Orthodox Jewish community in Lakewood, USA are considered in how the Canvey Island experiment is proceeded with.

2016-05-13-09-36-17--1070305669Toms River, a neighbouring community to Lakewood, took the step of implementing a law aimed at putting an end to what many of its residents and leaders labeled overly aggressive tactics by realtors.

Some observers suggested the measure was part of a campaign to block an increasing migration by members of the Lakewood community.

The other Toms River 'welcome' sign
The other Toms River ‘welcome’ sign

Tensions also simmered over comments made by Toms River Mayor, Thomas Kelaher. In an interview with Bloomberg News Service regarding the recent influx and his town’s reaction to it, Kelaher was quoted as saying, “It’s like an invasion. It’s the old throwback to the 1960s, when blockbusting happened in Philadelphia and Chicago with the African-American community — ‘I want to buy your house. You’ll be sorry if you don’t [sell it to me].”

In the wake of its publication, Lakewood Mayor Menashe Miller penned an open letter expressing deep offense over the use of the term “invasion,” which he said implied a takeover by a malicious group, and demanded an apology.

The intervention of AntiSemitismWatch comes after Joel Friedman, who works for the Interlink Foundation, a charity representing the community, confirmed half-a-dozen families have already bought houses on the Essex island.

One islander living near the proposed school site, who did not want to be named, told The Echo her family received a visit on Sunday afternoon from a groups of people interested in buying their home.

She said: “I was quite surprised really as they just started asking about house prices in the area, and whether we would be willing to sell ours.

“They were very polite, but it was just a bit random really. I’ve seen them knock on quite a few houses in our area over the past couple of weeks.

“I don’t think we’re ready to sell just yet, but I think it’s interesting they are so keen to move here.”

Dave Blackwell, leader of the Canvey Independent Party, said he is pleased the former Castle View site is becoming a school instead of housing.

He said: “From what I am hearing quite a few houses have already been bought and they are looking to create a large community here.

“I think it’s a good thing and particularly as the rest of that school site will actually get used and it won’t become housing as set out in the local plan.

“I have to say, I am not sure why Canvey has been chosen, as it’s not the easiest place to reach.”

The former Castle View site had originally been earmarked for 50 new homes, but developers pulled out of the school due to flood concerns.

The situation in Toms River has led representatives of the Chabad Jewish Center to file a law suit in federal court against Toms River and its Zoning Board of Adjustment. The legal move came after a refusal to allow small weekly prayer services in Rabbi Moshe Gourarie’s Toms River home.

The refusal was alleged to be a civil rights violation spurred by, “A rising tide of anti-Semitism among the Toms River government and population, fearful that the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community located in adjacent Lakewood Township will extend into Toms River,” the complaint suggested.

Thomas-KelaherIt also cited the statement by Mayor Kelaher and an antiSemitic act whereby the words “Burn the Jews” were carved into playground equipment at the nearby Riverwood Park.

The complaint further cited a number of statements made in various places on social media “regarding the Chabad and ultra-Orthodox Jews describing them as “cockroaches,” “trash,” a “cult,” “he-brews and she-brews,” a “Jewish conspiracy,” “disgusting phonies,” a “joo school,” “damn jews,” “dirty,” and a “disease.”

AntiSemitismWatch comment:

“Those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it.”

 

Anti-Semitic graffiti found in Toms River a microcosm for wider anti-Semitism

Arguably the most important contemporary question in respect to the increase in anti-Semitism is what lies behind it? Many theories abound but AntiSemitismWatch is convinced, through its worldwide network and monitoring, that all too often instances of anti-Semitism are derived from the atmosphere created when those with political or social agendas seek to impose their will on others.

This is most powerfully experienced across university campuses when those pushing their Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) viewpoint create a poisonous environment for anyone not persuaded or supportive of their cause.

AntiSemitismWatch has extensively covered the effects felt by Jewish and pro-Israel students and staff, for example, at Oxford University, City University of New York and King’s College London.

This is a point entirely lost by BDS supporters, conveniently or deliberately ignoring the reality. AntiSemitismWatch believes there are distinct parallels between this description and what is currently being experienced in Toms River.

Readers may already be familiar with the news that Toms River has implemented a law aimed at putting an end to what many of its residents and leaders labeled overly aggressive tactics by realtors. Some observers suggest the measure is part of a campaign to block an increasing migration by members of the neighboring Orthodox community of Lakewood. Against this backdrop, tensions have simmered over comments made by Toms River Mayor Thomas Kelaher.Thomas Kelaher

In an interview with Bloomberg News Service regarding the recent influx and his town’s reaction to it, Kelaher was quoted as saying, “It’s like an invasion. It’s the old throwback to the 1960s, when blockbusting happened in Philadelphia and Chicago with the African-American community — ‘I want to buy your house. You’ll be sorry if you don’t [sell it to me].”

Representatives of the Chabad Jewish Center have also filed a suit in federal court against Toms River and its Zoning Board of Adjustment alleging its refusal to allow small weekly prayer services in Rabbi Moshe Gourarie’s home is a civil rights violation spurred by a “rising tide of anti-Semitism” in the community.

In the latest incident that appears to have resulted from this cancerous environment, “Go back to Lakewood, Jew,” has been found carved into a picnic table in the local Riverwood Park.

The table was removed by the local authorities after they learned of the graffiti, according to Community Affairs Officer Ralph Stocco.

A police detective was assigned and the incident is being treated as a hate crime, according to Stocco. They are working to determine if this is related to an incident at the same park earlier this month where “Burn the Jews” was carved into playground equipment.

A number of social media statements regarding Chabad and ultra-Orthodox Jews have also been noted since the issue originally flared, describing them as “cockroaches,” “trash,” a “cult,” “he-brews and she-brews,” a “Jewish conspiracy,” “disgusting phonies,” a “joo school,” “damn jews,” “dirty,” and a “disease.”

AntiSemitismWatch believes on the basis of this analogy it is essential that individuals, groups, organisations, colleges and universities, governments and agencies begin taking the action necessary to prevent the further spread of anti-Semitism. It is clear one of the most effective tactics is standing against and preventing the poisonous and cancerous environments created by BDS and its associated acolytes like Israeli Apartheid Week.

It is also a powerful argument to be put to those communities and societies who, for whatever reason, like Toms River, seek to maintain an artificial status quo.

UPDATED: Hackers target US Universities sending anti-Semitic flyers to printers – Claim of responsibility

26/03/16 UPDATE: Investigations have been launched after numerous American Universities, including DePaul University in Chicago and University of Massachusetts Amherst, were attacked by hackers who sent anti-semitic flyers to multiple printers on campus.

depaulAlthough it has not yet been established if the incidents are linked, they happened within hours of each other. Both named universities have been quick to condemn the action. The flyers are said to white supremacist with anti-Semitic messages.

Universities have suggested that they believe the flyers were transmitted to the printers from an off-campus location and that the source of the hack were not university accounts.

The fliers read, “White man … are you sick and tired of the Jews destroying your country through mass immigration and degeneracy? Join us in the struggle for global white supremacy at The Daily Stormer,” in bold, black font. A pair of large swastikas, as well as the web address, are displayed on the printouts as well.

flyer

In a statement, DePaul University President Dennis Holtschneider said:

“We are currently investigating the breach as well as the source and origin of this despicable act, which certainly is not reflective of DePaul’s values nor of our campus culture where all are welcome.”

The UMass printout included a web address for an organisation classified as a hate group, their Chancellor, Kumble Subbaswamy, said in an email to the UMass community. University officials have not named the organisation.umass

“As a campus community, we condemn this cowardly and hateful act,” Subbaswamy said in the email. “This despicable incident reminds us that we must not be complacent as we continue to strive for a society that embraces diversity, inclusion and equity – a society where everyone feels safe and welcome.”

In the latest twist Andrew Auernheimer, better known by the alias “weev,” told The Washington Times he was behind the breach, using a freely available tool to scour “basically … the whole English-speaking Internet” for vulnerable devices that could be remotely accessed.

He claims to have within minutes identified roughly 29,000 printers that were connected to the Internet and could be exploited through an open port, then automated a procedure that asked each vulnerable machine to print the Daily Stormer ad.

“This isn’t a security issue,” Mr. Auernheimer told The Times. “I am communicating a political message solely by transmitting something incendiary. All the devices in the chain are acting in the exact manner of their designers.

“People are now calling the cops and crying hacking and hate crimes as a response,” he said. “This flies in the face of our traditions of free speech and the marketplace of ideas. I have the right to send you a message you dislike in an envelope. It’s your right to decide how to process that message, which may include throwing it in the trash.”

 

Toms River / Lakewood situation takes new twist

Toms River, New Jersey – Readers may already be familiar with the news that Toms River has implemented a law aimed at putting an end to what many of its residents and leaders labeled overly aggressive tactics by realtors. Some observers suggest the measure is part of a campaign to block an increasing migration by members of the neighboring Orthodox community of Lakewood. Against this backdrop, tensions have simmered over comments made by Toms River Mayor Thomas Kelaher.Thomas Kelaher

In an interview with Bloomberg News Service regarding the recent influx and his town’s reaction to it, Kelaher was quoted as saying, “It’s like an invasion. It’s the old throwback to the 1960s, when blockbusting happened in Philadelphia and Chicago with the African-American community — ‘I want to buy your house. You’ll be sorry if you don’t [sell it to me].”

In the wake of its publication, Lakewood Mayor Menashe Miller penned an open letter expressing deep offense over the use of the term “invasion,” which he said implied a takeover by a malicious group, and demanded an apology.

Now in the latest twist, representatives of the Chabad Jewish Center filed suit Tuesday in federal court against Toms River and its Zoning Board of Adjustment alleging its refusal to allow small weekly prayer services in Rabbi Moshe Gourarie’s home is a civil rights violation spurred by a “rising tide of anti-Semitism” in the community.

The lawsuit, which was filed in federal district court, asks the court to overturn the December decision of the zoning board rejecting the Chabad’s request for an interpretation that its activities were permitted and that Gourarie did not need a use variance to continue them.

The lawsuit, filed by Roman Storzer of Storzer & Greene of New York, in conjunction with Christopher Costa of Kenny Chase & Costa, accuses Toms River officials of violations of the First Amendment guarantee of free exercise of religion and the Fourteenth Amendment guarantee of equal protection under the law. It also alleges violations of the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (“RLUIPA”) and the Fair Housing Act.

More than 1,200 residents attended the board’s hearing on the Chabad’s application, which had to be moved to accommodate everyone who wanted to attend.

“These recent actions to shut down the Chabad took place during a rising tide of anti-Semitism among the Toms River government and population, fearful that the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community located in adjacent Lakewood Township will extend into Toms River,” the complaint says.

It cites the statement by Mayor Thomas Kelaher and the recent carving of the words “Burn the Jews” into playground equipment at Riverwood Park.

Kelaher, at a press conference last week, said the comments were simply a recitation of sworn testimony given when the township was considering implementing that ban, which took effect last Friday, March 18. He and others emphasized the conflicts were of a legal nature, not religious.

But the complaint also cites a number of statements made in various places on social media “regarding the Chabad and ultra-Orthodox Jews describing them as “cockroaches,” “trash,” a “cult,” “he-brews and she-brews,” a “Jewish conspiracy,” “disgusting phonies,” a “joo school,” “damn jews,” “dirty,” and a “disease.”

The result, the complaint says, was a collaborative effort between Toms River officials and residents with respect to various efforts to prevent ultra-Orthodox Jews from adjacent Lakewood Township from moving into Toms River.

“This cancerous movement targeting a specific religious minority has spread into Toms River,” Storzer said. “The use of local ordinances and land use regulation to build a wall around Lakewood should not be tolerated.”

Rabbi Moshe Zev Weisberg, a prominent Lakewood askan, said that, based on his experience with Kehaler in the past, he did not believe that his statement, nor other actions aimed at limiting Jewish buyers in the community, was motivated by anti-Semitism, but by “populism.”

“He’s pandering to what he thinks will work well for him politically,” he said.

“What’s the invasion? It’s a town, people are buying and selling,” said Rabbi Avi Schnall of Agudath Israel’s New Jersey division.

He said that aside from the comments themselves, the mayor’s encouragement of “Toms River Strong,” a grassroots movement discouraging residents from putting their homes on the market despite rising values, was “troubling.”

“Toms River Strong is being encouraged from the top; he’s giving them a platform,” said Rabbi Schnall. “He called a town meeting about this, not about crime or any other problems. This shows where his priorities are.”

Read more here.

 

 

Farrakhan can’t seem to make up his mind but praises Trump for rejecting ‘Jewish’ money

Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan now apparently admires GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump after initially claiming on his Facebook account on January 1 that, “If Donald Trump becomes president, he will take America into the abyss of Hell.”

“[Trump] is the only member who has stood in front of [the] Jewish community and said, ‘I don’t want your money,’” Farrakhan said on Monday during the Nation’s annual Saviours’ Day sermon, according to the Anti-Defamation League.

“Anytime a man can say to those who control the politics of America, ‘I don’t want your money,’ that means you can’t control me. And they cannot afford to give up control of the presidents of the United States.”

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Farrakhan stopped short of endorsing the outspoken billionaire’s presidential campaign, however.

“Not that I’m for Mr. Trump, but I like what I’m looking at,” he told listeners at the Nation’s Mosque Maryam in Chicago.

Farrakhan also accused the Jews of collaborating with the American government and instigating the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

“They needed another Pearl Harbor,” he said. “They needed some event that was cataclysmic, that would make the American people rise up, ready for war. “They plotted a false flag operation and when a government is so rotten that they will kill innocent people to accomplish a political objective, you are not dealing with a human.

“Now, they got into the [second] Bush administration and on 9/11 the Twin Towers went down. [Former President] George [W.] Bush and those devils, those Satans around him. They plotted 9/11. Ain’t no Muslim took control of that plane.”

Read more here.

Jewish community resort to hiring private security protection

Orthodox Jewish communities in Chicago, USA, feel so besieged that they have resorted to paying for security forces that the police cannot or will not provide.

After a series of attacks and Anti-Semitic threats, Jewish families in West Rogers Park region have lined up their own security force of off-duty Chicago police officers to patrol the neighborhood.

The armed officers set up outside Jewish institutions and use personal cars to drive through the area during the weekly Sabbath as well as Yom Tovs.

Resident David Kamish, 41, organised the patrols and collects $25 a month from more than 25 families to pay the officers. .

Read more here.

Global news from AntiSemitismWatch.com

ASW brings you the latest updates from around the world:

USA: The Washington Post reports Farrakhan told churchgoers on Sunday that Israelis and “Zionist Jews” played key roles in the September 11, 2001, terror attacks that left nearly 3,000 people dead.

“We now know that the crime they say is at the root of terrorism was not committed by Arabs or Muslims at all,” the Nation of Islam leader said in Chicago.

“It is now becoming apparent that there were many Israelis and Zionist Jews in key roles in the 9/11 attacks,” Mr. Farrakhan said. “Now look, if they can prove me wrong, like I said, I’ll pay with my life. Since they want to kill me anyway.”

The Anti-Defamation League (ADL), a Jewish NGO that fights against anti-Semitism, said Mr. Farrakhan’s latest speech “reaffirms his status as the leading anti-Semite in America.”

Pakistan: The self-declared last Jew in Pakistan, Fishel Benkhald, was savagely beaten by a Muslim mob Wednesday – and then arrested and roughed up again by police.

Reported in Arutz Sheva, Benkhald – the son of a Muslim father and a Jewish mother, but who identifies as Jewish – told how he had agreed to a face-to-face debate with a Muslim Pakistani man after a discussion on the topic of minority rights on Twitter.

“I went there alone but he was with his friends, we started the debate in a normal discussion manner but soon it got heated up and cursing started.”

“They started punching me and when I fell they started kicking my head. Someone also tried to snatch away my mobile.”

At that point police arrived, but instead of arresting his attackers, they detained Benkhald.

Blindfolded and cuffed, he was then handed over to Pakistan’s Rangers paramilitary force, who continued questioning him about his ethnic origins, and going through his social media pages after demanding his passwords.

“They beat me, but not much,” claims Benkhald, and accused him of being a spy for either Israel, the US or India.

Eventually he was released after his brother intervened and bailed him out. the ordeal left Benkhald with a swollen eye and bruising.

England: Stamford Hill residents have shown their support to back a campaign led by Hackney Unites to tackle an upcoming rally that is set to target the area’s Jewish population.

The campaign ‘We Choose HOPE’ responds to a proposed anti-Semitic rally, which is set to take place on March 22 and is organised by Joshua Bonehill-Paine, a far-right nationalist based in Somerset.

Bonehill-Paine has since been arrested and his bail conditions prevent him from coming to London, although it’s suspected many anti-Semites will still join the march.

John Page is leading the campaign to eradicate hate crimes from the borough. He said: “[Bonehill-Paine] expresses hatred for all ethnic minorities.” “Bonehill-Paine’s objective is to create tension between communities. However, it is evident that he has absolutely no support whatsoever in Hackney.”

Residents have begun taking pictures of themselves with friends or neighbours holding the slogan, “We choose HOPE” which they posted on social media.

“We know that Bonehill and his like want to create confrontation and division, and we felt we wanted to respond with a show of unity,” said Page.

Hackney Unites is a community coalition for social justice who work with communities across the borough that are creating positive change in their areas.