Tag Archives: CIDI

Poor response from top Dutch football club following release of anti-Semitic video

Dutch football team, PSV Eindhoven have been criticised for its response to a video of some of its fans filmed recently singing about burning Jews.

In the video, which was posted online yesterday (May 10), several dozen fans of the club were filmed at a McDonald’s singing a song that last year brought another Dutch team, FC Utrecht, into disrepute.

“My father was in the commandos, my mother was in the SS, together they burned Jews ’cause Jews burn the best,” the PSV Eindhoven fans allegedly sang.

images-2PSV Eindhoven’s spokesman, Thijs Slegers, told the Eindhovens Dagblad daily that while the club will study the footage to see if those filmed belong to the team, “If that’s not the case, there’s nothing we can do,” he said.

Slegers also said there is no proof the video was recorded Monday and that while the chant featured “a horrible text” his club needs “to study what went on” during the scene filmed.

A spokesman for the Center for Information and Documentation on Israel, or CIDI, which is a major Dutch watchdog on anti-Semitism, told the RTL broadcaster that “the images don’t lie.”

CIDI has filed a complaint with police for incitement against the people filmed singing.

Last year, the Dutch soccer association slapped FC Utrecht with a $12,000 fine on fans who sang the same song and another chant about Hamas and “sending Jews to the gas” during a match against Ajax.

Ajax and its supporters are often dubbed “Jews” because of the historical Jewish presence in Amsterdam, which is sometimes colloquially called “Mokum” after the Yiddish word for “place.”

Some Ajax fans embrace the label, and some have brought Israeli flags to matches before it was banned on the grounds that it invites anti-Semitic abuse.

On Monday, mass celebrations broke out in the Dutch eastern city after Eindhoven had clinched the Dutch Eredivisie league title by beating PEC Zwolle 3-1 on Sunday while Ajax could only manage a 1-1 draw at second-last De Graafschap. It was the second successive Eredivisie title for the club.

Visibility must be a price worth paying as anti-Semitism continues to thrive in Europe

coollogo_com-23172872

When AntiSemitismWatch launched its groundbreaking survey on the experience of ultra-Orthodox Jewish communities in the UK last year, it had a working premise. Namely, that their visibility would mean they were likely to have a markedly different experience in regards to anti-Semitism than the wider mainstream Jewish communities.

The results significantly bore out that theory, casting a huge shadow over the reliability of the published UK anti-Semitic hate crime figures.

Of all the respondents, 77% had witnessed or experienced anti-Semitism in the previous 12 months.

Of those, 49% had witnessed or experienced 3 or more anti-Semitic incidents (8% had witnessed or experienced 10 or more Anti-Semitic incidents in the previous 12 months).

images-3However, it would be wrong to leave the impression that vulnerability of visibility is an exclusive preserve of the ultra-Orthodox or the UK.

Just recently a Jewish student was denied a seat on a train in Berlin due to her Magen-David necklace.

Two women saw her, noticed her necklace, then put their bags on the empty seats next to them, to prevent her from sitting down.  They reaffirmed their actions through words of hate towards her.

Disgracefully, the other passengers studiously ignored what was going on and looked at the floor or window.

images-2The victim said she experiences such negative experiences whenever her Magen-David is visible, therefore,  usually choosing to hide it with a scarf.

On Wednesday we reported that Guy Muller of the Netherlands Center for Information and Documentation on Israel (CIDI) explained the hazards of appearing externally Jewish in public: “If you walk around and are identifiable as a Jew, there is a higher chance that you will be attacked. We know that there are people who are attacked more than once each year.”

Famously, Zvi Ammar, the head of Marseille’s Israelite Consistory urged men to stop wearing their kippah after yet a further violent anti-Semitic attack on a Jew.

Mr Ammar called on Jews “not to wear the kippah in the street to avoid being identified as Jewish”.

“It is sad to find ourselves in this position in 2016, in a great democratic country like France,” he said.

images“But faced with an exceptional situation, we have to take exceptional measures. It causes me such pain to come to this conclusion but I do not want anyone to die in Marseille because they had a kippah on their head.”

This led to remarkable scenes of French politicians, so usually ardent in their advocacy of secularism, wearing kippot into the national parliament.

None of these are truly a surprise against the backdrop of the rocketing rates of European anti-Semitism.

Just to say it was revealed that 35% of Hungarians hold “high or moderate” anti-Semitic views.

The survey, which questioned 1,200 Hungarian citizens on their views toward Jews, was initiated by the Action and Protection Foundation, a Hungarian organization combating anti-Semitism in the country.

Twenty-three percent of respondents claimed to hold “extreme” anti-Semitic views towards Jews, while 12% claimed to hold “moderate” anti-Semitic views towards Jews. Shockingly, 31% said they do not wish to have Jewish neighbors.

Even in neighboring Poland there is a high level of anti-Semitism. A survey conducted by the National Institute for Public Opinion Research found that 37% of respondents said they “do not like Jews”.

Yet, despite all of this, does AntiSemitismWatch suggest hiding away our precious signs of our Judaism? Of course not!

Do not hide. Take sensible precautions, in the same way any community or individual should, and rally, campaign and argue the point, but never hide. When they have forced us into hiding, that is a victory, the first broken window.

It will only encourage more of the same actions. Instead, find wherever the hate is being preached and stand against it.

Stand strong our friends!

Has anti-Semitism in the Netherlands become the norm again?

imagesThe Netherland’s Jews are once again finding themselves under attack as they witness an upsurge in anti-Semitic-related incidents. Slogans such as “filthy Jew” can increasingly be heard throughout the country, Holocaust denial has become commonplace, anti-Israel protests are the norm and a rising number of violent attacks go unreported.

Guy Muller of the Netherlands Center for Information and Documentation on Israel (CIDI) explained the hazards of appearing externally Jewish in public: “If you walk around and are identifiable as a Jew, there is a higher chance that you will be attacked. We know that there are people who are attacked more than once each year.”

Notwithstanding the recorded attacks, a report published by the European Union revealed that 74 percent of all Jewish victims of anti-Semitic attacks did not report the incidents to the authorities.

“They simply put up with it; they take a few hits, put their heads down and carry on,” said Muller.

This finding echos the 2015 AntiSemitismWatch survey results:

Of all the respondents, 77% had witnessed or experienced Anti-Semitism in the previous 12 months.

Of those, 49% had witnessed or experienced 3 or more Anti-Semitic incidents (8% had witnessed or experienced 10 or more Anti-Semitic incidents in the previous 12 months).

The overwhelming majority (59%) had never reported these incidents to the police or a third-party organisation, a potentially shocking indictment on the reliability of UK Anti-Semitism figures typically reported.

The situation for Dutch Jewry has become so worrisome that the country’s Chief Rabbi, Benjamin Jacobs, said, “People are debating removing the mezuzahs from their doorposts, since they identify them as Jews.”

“If I look back, 40 years ago never ever someone could call me a dirty Jew. 20 years ago also not. But slowly we see that it is getting worse.”

Indeed, back in February this year it was reported that the Deputy Prime Minister of the Netherlands, Lodewijk Asscher, had stopped interacting on social media because of anti-Semitic abuse against him.

What is your experience of the Netherlands?  Do you live, work or visit?  Does this article resonate with you?

Let us know via the comments section below or by email to secretary@antisemitismwatch.com

Amsterdam asked to rename hall honoring Nazi sympathizer

In a move usually reserved for parts of Eastern Europe, a Dutch watchdog on anti-Semitism has called on the City of Amsterdam to rename a municipal hall bearing the name of a former official who helped deport Jews to their deaths.

The Center for Information and Documentation on Israel, or CIDI, has urged the city government of the Dutch capital to scrap the honour it conferred more than thirty years ago to Piet Mijksenaar, a late top official with the city.2016-03-07-20-52-12-1617720259

The move followed the publication last month of a historian’s book about the Asterdorp Ghetto in Amsterdam’s north, which detailed Mijksenaar’s “enthusiastic help with the deportation of Jews, and that he strove to make this process rapid and efficient,” as CIDI described it in a statement.

According to the Het Parool Daily, Mijksenaar also helped save two Jews from the Hollandsche Schouwburg – an Amsterdam theatre house that Nazi occupation forces turned into an internment camp for Jews. But his record of collaboration with the Nazi occupation had remained obscure.

The book detailing Mijksenaar’s collaboration, “Asterdorp” by Stephan Steinmetz, also revealed that Amsterdam hiked rent prices for Jews after they had been confined to ghettos comprising city-owned real estate.

Follow this link to the original article.

David Irving has ‘nowhere’ to stay for speech

The British Holocaust denier David Irving has had his hotel reservation cancelled at the Mercure hotel in The Hague where he was to give a lecture on Thursday.

The hotel told him he was not welcome after consultation with The Hague council. Irving, who was to give a lecture entitled Hitler, Himmler and the Homosexuals, has been barred from several countries and was jailed in 2006 in Austria for denying or minimizing the Jewish genocide.

Irving getting the sort of reception some feel he deserves.
Irving getting the sort of reception some feel he deserves.

Among those protesting at Irving’s visit was the Dutch Israeli information centre CIDI which pointed out that he would be here on the day the Netherlands is commemorating the February strike of 1941. 75 years It is 75 years ago on Thursday that workers in Amsterdam and the surrounding areas went on strike in a protest against what was to be the beginning of the large-scale persecution of Jews in the Netherlands.

CIDI also called on “all owners of event halls in The Hague to offer no platform to the convict”.

The council says it cannot prevent him coming to The Hague, but only encourage venues not to give him a platform.

AntiSemitismWatch congratulates the Mercure Hotel!

And another European country shows rise in Antisemitic hate

Mirroring what has been happening in much of Europe, and further afield, the Netherlands is the latest nation to report a significant rise in Antisemitic hate crime and incidents.

Last year the number recorded rose by 71 percent and, worryingly, some police officers are unwilling to intervene, the Jewish community’s watchdog (the Hague-based Center for Information and Documentation on Israel, or CIDI) on Antisemitism said.

Their statement noted “a worrisome phenomenon — Police officers’ failure to intervene in cases of evident anti-Semitism. Some police officer prefers to look the other way.”

ASW24A woman who wanted to report an anti-Semitic threat after hosting a party was questioned about whether she had permission to hold the party, CIDI wrote.

“The filing of a complaint was sometimes discouraged in contrast with the policy that indeed seeks to enhance reporting,” according to the report.

CIDI also said the severity of the incidents increased. Those who wore kippahs or other Jewish symbols on the street accounted for a large portion of the overall number of victims of anti-Semitic harassment or attacks last year.

The prevalence of incidents in which individuals were harassed on the street because they were perceived as Jewish rose by 90 percent in 2014 over the previous year. Incidents in which people were physically assaulted in anti-Semitic attacks doubled.

“The serious increase of the number of anti-Semitic incidents in 2014 worsened the feeling of insecurity within the Jewish community, especially in view of the May 2014 attack on the Jewish Museum of Belgium in Brussels and the threat of returning jihadists,” CIDI wrote.

Read more here.