Tag Archives: Philadelphia

Word of caution to Stamford Hill community – Learn from the Lakewood experience

With members of the London Stamford Hill Charedi community being priced out of the area, some are now trying to snap up houses on Canvey Island, Essex.

2016-05-13-09-35-44--134583091

The site of the former Castle View School on the Island will be transformed into a private Jewish school, Essex County Council has confirmed.

The Charedi community, is understood to have paid £1.75million for the former school building, which closed five years ago, and its attached playing fields.

Residents living around the site have started to experience members of the community knocking on their doors offering to pay above the market price for their houses, despite them not being up for sale.

AntiSemitismWatch has already taken the step of sending messages into the Stamford Hill community in an attempt that the experiences of the Orthodox Jewish community in Lakewood, USA are considered in how the Canvey Island experiment is proceeded with.

2016-05-13-09-36-17--1070305669Toms River, a neighbouring community to Lakewood, took the step of implementing a law aimed at putting an end to what many of its residents and leaders labeled overly aggressive tactics by realtors.

Some observers suggested the measure was part of a campaign to block an increasing migration by members of the Lakewood community.

The other Toms River 'welcome' sign
The other Toms River ‘welcome’ sign

Tensions also simmered over comments made by Toms River Mayor, Thomas Kelaher. In an interview with Bloomberg News Service regarding the recent influx and his town’s reaction to it, Kelaher was quoted as saying, “It’s like an invasion. It’s the old throwback to the 1960s, when blockbusting happened in Philadelphia and Chicago with the African-American community — ‘I want to buy your house. You’ll be sorry if you don’t [sell it to me].”

In the wake of its publication, Lakewood Mayor Menashe Miller penned an open letter expressing deep offense over the use of the term “invasion,” which he said implied a takeover by a malicious group, and demanded an apology.

The intervention of AntiSemitismWatch comes after Joel Friedman, who works for the Interlink Foundation, a charity representing the community, confirmed half-a-dozen families have already bought houses on the Essex island.

One islander living near the proposed school site, who did not want to be named, told The Echo her family received a visit on Sunday afternoon from a groups of people interested in buying their home.

She said: “I was quite surprised really as they just started asking about house prices in the area, and whether we would be willing to sell ours.

“They were very polite, but it was just a bit random really. I’ve seen them knock on quite a few houses in our area over the past couple of weeks.

“I don’t think we’re ready to sell just yet, but I think it’s interesting they are so keen to move here.”

Dave Blackwell, leader of the Canvey Independent Party, said he is pleased the former Castle View site is becoming a school instead of housing.

He said: “From what I am hearing quite a few houses have already been bought and they are looking to create a large community here.

“I think it’s a good thing and particularly as the rest of that school site will actually get used and it won’t become housing as set out in the local plan.

“I have to say, I am not sure why Canvey has been chosen, as it’s not the easiest place to reach.”

The former Castle View site had originally been earmarked for 50 new homes, but developers pulled out of the school due to flood concerns.

The situation in Toms River has led representatives of the Chabad Jewish Center to file a law suit in federal court against Toms River and its Zoning Board of Adjustment. The legal move came after a refusal to allow small weekly prayer services in Rabbi Moshe Gourarie’s Toms River home.

The refusal was alleged to be a civil rights violation spurred by, “A rising tide of anti-Semitism among the Toms River government and population, fearful that the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community located in adjacent Lakewood Township will extend into Toms River,” the complaint suggested.

Thomas-KelaherIt also cited the statement by Mayor Kelaher and an antiSemitic act whereby the words “Burn the Jews” were carved into playground equipment at the nearby Riverwood Park.

The complaint further cited a number of statements made in various places on social media “regarding the Chabad and ultra-Orthodox Jews describing them as “cockroaches,” “trash,” a “cult,” “he-brews and she-brews,” a “Jewish conspiracy,” “disgusting phonies,” a “joo school,” “damn jews,” “dirty,” and a “disease.”

AntiSemitismWatch comment:

“Those who forget the past are doomed to repeat it.”

 

Anti-Semitic graffiti found in Toms River a microcosm for wider anti-Semitism

Arguably the most important contemporary question in respect to the increase in anti-Semitism is what lies behind it? Many theories abound but AntiSemitismWatch is convinced, through its worldwide network and monitoring, that all too often instances of anti-Semitism are derived from the atmosphere created when those with political or social agendas seek to impose their will on others.

This is most powerfully experienced across university campuses when those pushing their Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) viewpoint create a poisonous environment for anyone not persuaded or supportive of their cause.

AntiSemitismWatch has extensively covered the effects felt by Jewish and pro-Israel students and staff, for example, at Oxford University, City University of New York and King’s College London.

This is a point entirely lost by BDS supporters, conveniently or deliberately ignoring the reality. AntiSemitismWatch believes there are distinct parallels between this description and what is currently being experienced in Toms River.

Readers may already be familiar with the news that Toms River has implemented a law aimed at putting an end to what many of its residents and leaders labeled overly aggressive tactics by realtors. Some observers suggest the measure is part of a campaign to block an increasing migration by members of the neighboring Orthodox community of Lakewood. Against this backdrop, tensions have simmered over comments made by Toms River Mayor Thomas Kelaher.Thomas Kelaher

In an interview with Bloomberg News Service regarding the recent influx and his town’s reaction to it, Kelaher was quoted as saying, “It’s like an invasion. It’s the old throwback to the 1960s, when blockbusting happened in Philadelphia and Chicago with the African-American community — ‘I want to buy your house. You’ll be sorry if you don’t [sell it to me].”

Representatives of the Chabad Jewish Center have also filed a suit in federal court against Toms River and its Zoning Board of Adjustment alleging its refusal to allow small weekly prayer services in Rabbi Moshe Gourarie’s home is a civil rights violation spurred by a “rising tide of anti-Semitism” in the community.

In the latest incident that appears to have resulted from this cancerous environment, “Go back to Lakewood, Jew,” has been found carved into a picnic table in the local Riverwood Park.

The table was removed by the local authorities after they learned of the graffiti, according to Community Affairs Officer Ralph Stocco.

A police detective was assigned and the incident is being treated as a hate crime, according to Stocco. They are working to determine if this is related to an incident at the same park earlier this month where “Burn the Jews” was carved into playground equipment.

A number of social media statements regarding Chabad and ultra-Orthodox Jews have also been noted since the issue originally flared, describing them as “cockroaches,” “trash,” a “cult,” “he-brews and she-brews,” a “Jewish conspiracy,” “disgusting phonies,” a “joo school,” “damn jews,” “dirty,” and a “disease.”

AntiSemitismWatch believes on the basis of this analogy it is essential that individuals, groups, organisations, colleges and universities, governments and agencies begin taking the action necessary to prevent the further spread of anti-Semitism. It is clear one of the most effective tactics is standing against and preventing the poisonous and cancerous environments created by BDS and its associated acolytes like Israeli Apartheid Week.

It is also a powerful argument to be put to those communities and societies who, for whatever reason, like Toms River, seek to maintain an artificial status quo.

Toms River / Lakewood situation takes new twist

Toms River, New Jersey – Readers may already be familiar with the news that Toms River has implemented a law aimed at putting an end to what many of its residents and leaders labeled overly aggressive tactics by realtors. Some observers suggest the measure is part of a campaign to block an increasing migration by members of the neighboring Orthodox community of Lakewood. Against this backdrop, tensions have simmered over comments made by Toms River Mayor Thomas Kelaher.Thomas Kelaher

In an interview with Bloomberg News Service regarding the recent influx and his town’s reaction to it, Kelaher was quoted as saying, “It’s like an invasion. It’s the old throwback to the 1960s, when blockbusting happened in Philadelphia and Chicago with the African-American community — ‘I want to buy your house. You’ll be sorry if you don’t [sell it to me].”

In the wake of its publication, Lakewood Mayor Menashe Miller penned an open letter expressing deep offense over the use of the term “invasion,” which he said implied a takeover by a malicious group, and demanded an apology.

Now in the latest twist, representatives of the Chabad Jewish Center filed suit Tuesday in federal court against Toms River and its Zoning Board of Adjustment alleging its refusal to allow small weekly prayer services in Rabbi Moshe Gourarie’s home is a civil rights violation spurred by a “rising tide of anti-Semitism” in the community.

The lawsuit, which was filed in federal district court, asks the court to overturn the December decision of the zoning board rejecting the Chabad’s request for an interpretation that its activities were permitted and that Gourarie did not need a use variance to continue them.

The lawsuit, filed by Roman Storzer of Storzer & Greene of New York, in conjunction with Christopher Costa of Kenny Chase & Costa, accuses Toms River officials of violations of the First Amendment guarantee of free exercise of religion and the Fourteenth Amendment guarantee of equal protection under the law. It also alleges violations of the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (“RLUIPA”) and the Fair Housing Act.

More than 1,200 residents attended the board’s hearing on the Chabad’s application, which had to be moved to accommodate everyone who wanted to attend.

“These recent actions to shut down the Chabad took place during a rising tide of anti-Semitism among the Toms River government and population, fearful that the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community located in adjacent Lakewood Township will extend into Toms River,” the complaint says.

It cites the statement by Mayor Thomas Kelaher and the recent carving of the words “Burn the Jews” into playground equipment at Riverwood Park.

Kelaher, at a press conference last week, said the comments were simply a recitation of sworn testimony given when the township was considering implementing that ban, which took effect last Friday, March 18. He and others emphasized the conflicts were of a legal nature, not religious.

But the complaint also cites a number of statements made in various places on social media “regarding the Chabad and ultra-Orthodox Jews describing them as “cockroaches,” “trash,” a “cult,” “he-brews and she-brews,” a “Jewish conspiracy,” “disgusting phonies,” a “joo school,” “damn jews,” “dirty,” and a “disease.”

The result, the complaint says, was a collaborative effort between Toms River officials and residents with respect to various efforts to prevent ultra-Orthodox Jews from adjacent Lakewood Township from moving into Toms River.

“This cancerous movement targeting a specific religious minority has spread into Toms River,” Storzer said. “The use of local ordinances and land use regulation to build a wall around Lakewood should not be tolerated.”

Rabbi Moshe Zev Weisberg, a prominent Lakewood askan, said that, based on his experience with Kehaler in the past, he did not believe that his statement, nor other actions aimed at limiting Jewish buyers in the community, was motivated by anti-Semitism, but by “populism.”

“He’s pandering to what he thinks will work well for him politically,” he said.

“What’s the invasion? It’s a town, people are buying and selling,” said Rabbi Avi Schnall of Agudath Israel’s New Jersey division.

He said that aside from the comments themselves, the mayor’s encouragement of “Toms River Strong,” a grassroots movement discouraging residents from putting their homes on the market despite rising values, was “troubling.”

“Toms River Strong is being encouraged from the top; he’s giving them a platform,” said Rabbi Schnall. “He called a town meeting about this, not about crime or any other problems. This shows where his priorities are.”

Read more here.

 

 

Latest round the world update from AntiSemitismWatch

Britain

Chuka Umunna has identified problems with anti-Semitism “on the fringes of the left”, and singled out Ken Livingstone as the “obvious example” of someone who has “very much offended” Jewish people.

Chuka Umunna
Chuka Umunna

Speaking to The House magazine, the Labour MP said: “I think there is a problem with anti-Semitism on the fringes of the left, there is no doubt about that; it would be completely disingenuous to deny that. And there are some people who have clearly said some things which have very much offended the Jewish community. Ken Livingstone’s the obvious example.”

In 2005, Livingstone, the left-wing former London mayor, faced heavy criticism after he likened a Jewish newspaper reporter to a Nazi concentration camp guard.

Livingstone later said the incident was “a huge fuss over nothing”, and attacked the Jewish community for being “obsessive” about his relationship with an extremist preacher.

Read more here.

Philadelphia, USA

A community meeting in a gentrifying neighborhood of Philadelphia was forced to end abruptly after local activists hurled anti-Semitic comments at Jewish real estate developers.

At the Feb. 22 meeting in Point Breeze, in South Philadelphia, activists with Concerned Citizens of Point Breeze yelled “Go back to Israel!” and other insults at developers who were making presentations, Philly.com reported.pointbreeze

“This was not one person with a screw loose. This was a mob mentality,” Ori Feibush, a local developer who is Jewish but was not presenting at the meeting, told Philly.com.

One witness, who asked not to be identified, told Philly.com he heard someone shout “Go back to Lakewood,” a town in New Jersey with a large concentration of Orthodox Jews.

City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson said that while past meetings concerning gentrification have “become heated,” it “never rose to this level of disrespect.”

Johnson, who was not at the meeting but heard about it from an aide who was attending, added that “those comments — whether anti-Semitic or racial — are totally unacceptable and will not be tolerated.”

Read more here.

Australia

A GLEN Eira councillor has been censured by fellow councillors for making disparaging remarks in the council chamber about the Jewish community.

Cllr Oscar Lobo
Cllr Oscar Lobo

In a tense council meeting on Tuesday night, Oscar Lobo’s eight fellow councillors unanimously voted to censure him for comments that, in the words of the motion, were “racist and anti-Semitic”.

During a debate on community security at Glen Eira Council’s December 15 meeting, Lobo, who has served as Glen Eira’s deputy mayor, caused outrage by remarking that maybe the Jewish community “wouldn’t have to worry about being attacked if they didn’t draw attention to themselves”.

A statement from B’nai B’rith Anti-Defamation Commission chair Dr Dvir Abramovich was read to the council, in which he said blaming Jews for anti-Semitism “is one of the oldest and most pernicious anti-Semitic myths”.

Councillors also voted unanimously to adopt a second motion censuring Lobo for remarks he made “that he has been the subject of racism” in the council chamber and urging Lobo “to undertake counselling” which the council was prepared to facilitate.

Read more here.